abr
09

La primavera en español

It’s that time of the year again! Who’s loving this season so far?
Let’s learn some vocabulary to talk about spring in Spanish.
Download the infographic here

We have prepared some vocabulary exercises so that you can practice Spanish in a fun way. Click the button below to find them on Quizlet. You can join our study group on Quizlet to access other vocabulary sets!

Practicar en Quizlet (1)

Check out our Spanish face to face and online extensive and private courses with a free level test and no registration fees.

Spanish is online with Dime!

abr
02

Easter in Spain: Mona de Pascua

Easter (“Pascua”) is an important time in the Spanish holiday calendar. After looking back on the passion, death and resurrection of Jesus during the Holy Week (“Semana Santa”), Easter is a joyful and sweet celebration.

Even though the tradition varies slightly in each region, Easter is mostly celebrated by eating the “Easter cake”, which in Catalonia is known as “Mona”. Children receive a “Mona” from their godfather each year until they’re 12. Traditionally, the godfather would pick it up on Sunday and on Easter Monday the whole family would go to the countryside and eat the “Mona”, like a picnic.

The cake has changed a lot through the years, from a simple sponge cake decorated with hard-boiled eggs (as many as the child’s age), to a multiple-layer cake decorated with sophisticated chocolate figures. The three essential elements to call a cake a “Mona” are: little chick figurines, colored feathers and chocolate eggs.

In Spain you’ll see these “Monas” in bakeries, cake shops and supermarkets from about a week before Easter Monday until a week after, approximately. Don’t be shy to order your perfect “Mona”, they’re usually customizable in flavor and figurines!

Have you ever tried the Easter cake “Mona”? How is Easter celebrated in your country?

Let us know in the comments!

 

Check out our Spanish face to face and online extensive and private courses with a free level test and no registration fees.

Spanish is online with Dime!

 

*Imagen Mona de Pascua por CPGXK. Extraída de Flickr, con licencia Creative Commons CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

feb
26

How to follow the Dime blog

Did you know that we create content in our blog every week? You can check our weekly posts in our social media channels, but today we present you with a tool you can use to follow our blog and any other feeds you’re interested in, all in one place: Feedly.

Feedly is a news aggregator, it reds RSS feeds from sources you choose, and it displays the content in an organized way you can customize. It’s a free registration website and app, even though it also offers premium plans with advanced features. With the free version, you can follow up to 100 sources and organize them into 3 feeds.

You can check your Feedly account every day to see what’s new, or you can also install the Feedly Notifier extension in your browser for it to show notifications in the top bar when there’s something new for you to read (email notifications are premium).

Here’s how you can find and follow us through Feedly:

Here’s how to organize the content:

And this is what the notifications look like:

Don’t miss any of our posts about learning Spanish language and culture!

Did you know this tool? Let us know in the comments!

 

Check out our Spanish face to face and online extensive and private courses with a free level test and no registration fees.

Spanish is online with Dime!

feb
19

Expresar continuidad en español

It’s been almost a year since many things changed due to the pandemic. However, some may have remained the same, whether it’s a morning yoga routine or walking the dog. Today we’ll learn how to express continuity in Spanish.

Seguir + gerund
Continuar + gerund

The verbs “seguir” and “continuar” have a meaning in common, which is “to continue”, despite that “seguir” has other meanings which “continuar” doesn’t share. However, when “seguir” and “continuar” are followed by a gerund, they mean “to keep on doing” or “to continue doing” and are generally interchangeable with little difference in meaning.

Pablo sigue haciendo deporte en casa, le encanta.
Pablo keeps on doing sport at home, he loves it.

Continúo hablando con mi familia por zoom todas las semanas.
I continue chatting with my family on zoom every week.

Todavía + present (indicative)

This combination of the adverb “todavía” (which means “still”) and a verb conjugated in the present form, means that something hasn’t changed yet. Therefore, it somehow implies that it’s natural to think it will eventually change, or that there is a plan or hope that it will change.

Todavía llevamos mascarilla fuera de casa.
We still wear masks outside our homes. (we have until now and that hasn’t changed, but we hope it will soon)

 ¿Todavía estudias japonés?
Do you still study Japanese? (you have until now, but the person asking feels it has probably changed or will soon)

 

Our students continue learning Spanish! ¡Nuestros estudiantes siguen aprendiendo español!
¿What stayed the same for you despite the pandemic?

Let us know in the comments!

 

 

Check out our Spanish face to face and online extensive and private courses with a free level test and no registration fees.

Spanish is online with Dime!

feb
10

El Carnaval en España

carnaval España

It’s “Carnaval” week! This celebration takes place every year between February and March, and it fills the streets with colors and music in a very cheerful atmosphere. Even though this year most events have been cancelled due to the pandemic, let’s take a look at what you’ll hopefully be able to see next year.

“Carnaval” has a religious origin. Leading up to Lent, it’s a period of celebration and excess before parties and fatty food are prohibited for forty days. Traditionally, it was said that there were no restrictions during this celebration, so people decided to wore a mask to ensure their anonymity during such a crazy celebration.

The biggest and most famous “Carnaval” festivals are:

  • Carnaval de Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Islas Canarias): it’s the most international and it lasts 3 weeks. It’s full of music, parades and elaborated, colorful costumes. One of the main events is the designation of the queen of the “Carnaval”.
carnaval tenerifecarnaval las palmas
  • Carnaval de Cádiz (Andalucía): it lasts 10 days and it has a rather humorous approach. The associations participating prepare satirical songs and costumes, and there’s traditional music.
Carnaval Cádiz
  • Carnaval de Sitges (Catalonia): it lasts for 7 days and it’s not as big, but it has been celebrated for more than 100 years. It’s open to all ages and it offers a wide range of activities and contests.

The celebrations end on Ash Wednesday. It’s a more solemn event consisting on a parade, at the end of which people observe the burning of a figure in the shape of a sardine (event known as “El entierro de la sardina”). It symbolizes letting go of the past to welcome spring and a new period.

entierro de la sardina carnaval

Have you ever participated in the “Carnaval” celebrations in Spain? If there a similar celebration in your country?

Let us know in the comments!

 

Check out our Spanish face to face and online extensive and private courses with a free level test and no registration fees.

Spanish is online with Dime!

 

*Imagen Carnaval de Tenerife (reina): por Tamara Kulikova. Extraída de Wikipedia, con licencia Creative Commons BY CC 4.0
*Imagen Carnaval de Las Palmas (baile): por Juan Ramón Rodríguez Sosa. Extraída de Wikipedia, con licencia Creative Commons CC BY-SA 2.0
*Imagen Carnaval de Cádiz: por Emilio J. Rodríguez Posada. Extraída de Wikipedia, con licencia Creative Commons CC BY-SA 2.0
*Imagen Entierro de la sardina: por Diario de Madrid. Extraída de Wikipedia, con licencia Creative Commons BY CC 4.0

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